March 17th

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It’s beautiful weather for today’s St. Patrick’s Day parade in New York City. Our parade is the largest celebration of the Irish in the world, with over 150,000 marchers, three million+ people watching the parade along Fifth Avenue, and millions more partying-it-up in bars throughout the five boroughs of New York.

The big crowds and pageantry are thrilling, but I have found the most kinship in the enjoyment of traditional Irish dance and music. There are many “All-Irish Champions” from America in both arts. I think our American heritage has added some verve and vigorous expression to the originals.photo8.jpg

I recommend to anyone looking to get in touch with their Irish roots–or non-Irish who feel drawn to the beat and melodies–to connect through the music and dance.   O’Malley Irish Dance Academy in Brooklyn, NY has a wonderful troupe of dancers and teachers.   I saw them perform at St. Andrew the Apostle Church in Bay Ridge at our first St. Patrick/St. Joseph Celebration in 2006.     The kids had all the old immigrants from Ireland, the generations and their friends and families, clapping and stamping, and shouting and singing along to the music.   The dancers and audience had a wonderful time together.

Enjoy the day!
Taking their name from the name of a traditional Irish jig, the group initially won recognition as the first and only all-women traditional Irish band. In a relatively short time, they soon established themselves as musicians and performers without peer and have won many thousands of listeners and fans of their music.Taking their name from the name of a traditional Irish jig, the group initially won recognition as the first and only all-women traditional Irish band. In a relatively short time, they soon established themselves as musicians and performers without peer and have won many thousands of listeners and fans of their music.

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